piano homework beginners

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Hit enter to search or ESC to close. Daft punk homework blogspot The debut album from Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo arrived inright around the proliferation. We can help with that too, crafting a course paper, a dissertation, etc.

Piano homework beginners doing homework anamie

Piano homework beginners

I love that the worksheet includes a keyboard diagram above the notes of the scale. This diagram is especially helpful for beginners who may not yet be able to quickly identify whole and half steps while viewing music notation.

They can refer to the piano keyboard diagram if needed to mark the half steps on the scale. Scales help us understand how one note relates to another within a key, so I encourage you to have your student practice playing scales and know the theory behind how they are formed with half steps and whole steps.

Click on the image to the right to print the older student version of the major scales activity. Another element that we spend a ton of time on in my studio is chords. When students have a solid understanding of chords—how to play them, how to build them and how to recognize them in their pieces, everything gets easier!

When reading music, beginner students will often read individual notes, which makes practice cumbersome and time consuming. But if a student knows chords well, the amount of time required to learn a new piece is significantly reduced. Chords are also a super easy way to harmonize a melody when kids make up their own songs or want to embellish a simple piece.

The worksheet featured here helps kids master the formula for building major chords. The half step formula is listed at the top of the page and students just color in the keys needed to complete each chord. This is one of my favorite music theory worksheets to use with older beginners. I like to help them learn their chords as quickly as possible so that they can start having fun with piano improv. This worksheet will help your students pay attention to the details of the symbols and learn how to draw them correctly.

Students first trace and then draw the brace, double bar line, bass clef, and treble clef. Then when they immediately draw it free hand much more accurately. The first time students draw a brace or a clef it will look wacky. Students often mix up the half and whole rests, and when they draw them it helps kids to better be able to distinguish the two when they are reading their sheet music.

The biggest monster for most students, however, is the quarter rest. That little squiggly line can cause a lot of frustration for kids. Help your students understand the difference between half steps and whole steps with these colorful printables. The activity is easy to use because kids just look at the highlighted keys and then circle their answer.

You might go one step further and ask your students to play the notes on the keyboard. Kids who are kinesthetic learners will especially benefit from playing and vocalizing the steps they see. I recommend that you begin with the keyboard worksheet and then introduce this worksheet that has notes on the staff. This worksheet can be used to build a foundation before delving into the identification of music intervals by type. Help kids complete this worksheet by having them sit at the keyboard and play the notes.

With time, students will be able to identify the steps without sitting at the piano, but this is a great way to help them visualize the distance between the notes. At times you may want to focus on just the treble clef or the bass clef , so I created a few worksheets that isolate each clef.

If your students struggle to identify the higher notes on the treble staff, you can use a treble printable to provide extra practice. Click the link to see more treble clef worksheets. The most common issue I see is kids that are great with the right hand notes, but really struggle to identify bass clef notes.

You can view all bass clef worksheets by clicking bass clef worksheets. Do you have any older students who desperately need more practice with bass clef notes, but who resist those boring flashcards? Try this fun Catch Bigfoot activity.

To play, you give students a time to beat in order to catch Bigfoot. The worksheets in this section are very basic, which is ideal for young children. Revisit these introductory rhythm concepts often during the first few months of music study and your little students will have a solid rhythm foundation for their future studies. Do you have really young students who need extra reinforcement with rhythm basics? I created Playing With Rhythm especially for those little ones.

First review with your students what half notes and quarter notes look like. I usually point to a quarter note first and ask the kids to describe what it looks like. Then I point to a half note and ask them to tell me what makes this note different from the first note. Then play! Kids just draw a line from the note to its numeric value.

Your young students will have a blast if you give them bright crayons and encourage them to draw crazy, curly or zig zaggy hair. The music alphabet is among the most basic of music theory concepts. Your older students will nail it down within 5 minutes, but younger kids will need to practice through both written and oral review.

This first worksheet is for introducing the music alphabet. You can show them the print out and explain that the music alphabet is just like the regular alphabet, only easier because it has just 7 letters. Invite your student to point to each letter while you recite the music alphabet.

Next, hand the child a pencil and ask her to copy the music alphabet onto the lines. At the next few lessons, continue reviewing the music alphabet by asking the student to verbalize it with you and also write it down. Use this worksheet to see if your students really do understand the music alphabet. Kids just look at each box and fill in the letter that comes next.

The trickiest is the letter G—many students will write H. Remind them that A comes after G in the music alphabet. Either of this worksheets can be used with manipulatives. You can use alphabet letter tiles or beads and ask the student to place a bead of the correct letter on the black space. Adding this kind of variety to your lessons will help your students stay excited about piano. I just love holidays in the piano studio!

Kids get super excited about the holiday events and the fun themes give us the perfect opportunity to explore new ways to learn and apply music theory. Which of these free printable music theory worksheets are your favorites? What other fun ideas do you have for teaching theory? Leave a comment below to help out the other piano teachers in our online community. Like and share myfunpianostudio. Sign up for my email newsletter and get 2 free group lesson games that your students will love. Click the button below to subscribe and get the 2 free group games.

Thank you for this! My younger kids love doing worksheets with lots of bright colours like this! Thanks for these worksheets during this time. These worksheets will complement my temporary online instruction for K12 after-school lessons. Thank you! I think its fantastic how you create or find all these resources just to hook kids into music. As a public educator with very little resources, I love the free worksheets and activity ideas. Thank you!!! I know what you mean, Teri.

Wow, wow, WOW! Thank you so much! I have a new 5 year old starting tomorrow. Will laminate and use these. YOu made my day!! Thank you, Kristin, for a terrific site. I look forward to using these worksheets with my students. I think note names in general are hard for some students. Thanks so much for sharing these learning activities! I know several of my students who will love the cute pictures that somehow make worksheets more fun!

Thank you very much Kristin. They are very appreciated and my students will enjoy them. You are very kind! This is awesome! Thank you so much for selflessly sharing these learning activities. Absolutely a helpful and fun way to learn music theories.

Love it :. Thanks for being so kind. Hope your students have a lot of fun! Thank you so much for these fabulous worksheets!! It makes music theory cool to teach and learn. Your hard work is appreciated! Thanks, Roberta! You think like I do! Not many music teachers in South Africa shares this attitude! I hope I can get these downloaded!

Before Computer! Ilse, how wonderful that these worksheets are being used all the way in South Africa. Great job keeping the right frame of mind during so many years of teaching. Your students are lucky to have you! Thank you Kristin! So kind and generous of you to make these worksheets and activities available to all. I can only imagine the time and effort you have put into all this! With appreciation, Peter.

Thanks, Peter! It has been a lot of effort to make these, but worth it when they help kids make more progress and help other teachers save time on lesson prep. Thanks for your kind comment. I loved it! I share all the comments about music theory being fun fun fun! Music theory can be very challenging. Thank you for these awesome Ideas! Hi, I was struggling hard to teach my son 6yo the music notes as I am not music trained.

This site was an answered prayer! Thank You for your generous sharing for the spread of music education!! I teach mainly Visual Arts. Am very encouraged and inspired by blogs like yours and strive to give freely as well. Lots of Gratitude from the heart! Angie, what a sweet comment. What a wonderful mother you are! Thank you so much for these worksheets! My son has autism, visual processing disorder and dyslexia and has been taking piano lessons for almost one year. He has been making steady progress, but we are still having trouble learning the note names.

Also each time a new concept is introduced, it is difficult for him to master it. These worksheets are a answer to prayer for us. We are making more progress since we found them than we had before. He is truly enjoying learning the piano and this has given him such a much needed confidence boost. That is wonderful! It warms my heart to hear that something I created has played a small role in helping your son with his musical education. Thank you for helping kids learn music. My kids are missing out on band and basics.

This makes it easier for me to teach them to read music and appreciate it. So glad these are helpful, Laura. These resources are very useful. Thank you very much Kristin for your very creative mind and generous heart to share all of your ideas with us. May God bless you always for thinking others. I was wondering if you had any more worksheets on note values than listed here? Maybe some with time signatures or adding up the note values or creating rhythms. So glad that these worksheets are helpful!

Thank you for making all of these great resources available! I will be starting to teach lessons this summer after a hiatus. I am excited to try these ideas with my new students! Terima kasih Thank u from Indonesia. This is my first year being a music teacher in a formal school. These worksheets help me a lot. Do you have the answer keys to these worksheets?

Their teacher wants them to practice note identification and I love these…. Thank yo!!! Thanks so much for these free printables!! I have a Life Skills music student who is moving to the far, far north of Canada where there is no school past Grade 8 age 13 or so. Thanks so much! You have really encouraged me to start a group pre-piano class.

I have some fun games and ideas to get it going. I also do a lot with movement since I am a retired general music teacher so I feel confident I have enough to get started! I am looking for a printable that I saw online yesterday. It was a fun way of illustrating the e,b,and f lines on the treble clef. Was this one on your printables? Hi Debbie! Yes, a link to the printable can be found on the Treble Clef Worksheets page.

Best wishes for you and your students! Thanks for your kind comment! Just found your website tonight while looking for resources to teach my children Music Theory for our homeschool. Thank you so much for developing and sharing all these pro tables and taking the time to explain how to use them!

We will be using this resource a lot, and I will share it with others. I was pleasantly surprised when I found these helpful, colourful and creative worksheets. Your site has great ideas for my special education students in middle school. They have just the right amount of examples to accommodate middle school students in my LIMMS classes! I loved them all! I only copied a few right now but perfect for my intervals, and scales lessons! The students will love them. I can also leave these for a sub to use as well!

Jean, your kind comment made my day. Keep up your great work! These are fabulous. I teach chorus in a k and i find them really helpful in my classes as well! You made these sheets right around when my baby was born and now she is 5 and using them. Oh how wonderful! These worksheets are really great! I know it took a lot of work and time to put these together. Thank you so much, these worksheets and tips are amazing and so helpful when still finding your teaching feet.

I teach grades and have found your worksheets extremely useful. They are set out very logically and the instructions are clear. Thank you for your hard work — it is truly appreciated. Thanks Tessa! I have been looking for something to add a little fun to my studio!

This looks like just what I need!!! I teach piano from Your data is wonderful. Thanks to you I think I can have a fun class with my children. Thank for the data. Thank you so much for these wonderful worksheets which you offer for free on your website. I really appreciate your generosity! May God bless you and reward you for all the hard work you put into making them! Greetings from Romania! My daughter wants to start playing more piano this year so we need to find a great teacher in the area.

Hope this helps, and best wishes to your daughter as she begins piano lessons! I love that you set up expectations from the beginning. That and get the student playing lovely music from the beginning! Those are things I do at my first lesson as well.

Great article! I am also going to look up Billy Boy. I loved singing that song in elementary music class as a child! Thanks, Rochelle! I have found over the years that the more quickly I set up expectations, the better our piano-student-parent relationship goes. Then there are no surprises! My niece really wants to learn how to play the piano this upcoming year.

I liked that you pointed out that my sister should find her a teacher that makes her feel at ease. Stress seems like it would make it harder for my niece to learn and have fun. The first piano teacher that a child has is THE most important piano teacher for that child. That teacher can help the child love music and love learning, or that teacher could do the opposite.

There are so many ways that we can make our prospective students feel at ease, and that always builds trust and helps the lessons go much more smoothly. Best wishes to your sister and niece in finding the perfect teacher, Ivy!

So helpful, as always Melody. I am not familiar with Billy Boy so am going to look into it now. The kids love standing up and looking into the piano and seeing how it works before they play. Thanks so much, Sophie! Do you have an assignment sheet form that is used for your email after the lesson? I was thrilled to read this post. I have been teaching piano for many years and for my beginners have drawn from a lot of teaching resources.

I was so amazed reading that I do so many of the same things. The best piece ever and instantly they love playing the piano! Have used it for over 35 years! I really enjoyed the article, made me feel like I am doing things right! I have 3 daughters who also teach and they have adopted my first lesson as well, had to share with them. I also have many of your theory and game resources and enjoy them. Thank you so much for your comments, Cindy!

LFO definitely was a genius at writing those perfect teaching pieces. Thank you again for your kind words, and happy teaching to you and your daughters! I always find something helpful and encouraging. Thank you for sharing your expertise with your fellow teachers!

Thanks so much for reading, Rebecca! You just made my day. Have a wonderful week of lessons, and happy teaching! I want to make your life as a music teacher easier by writing and sharing helpful and relevant music teaching articles, and by creating educational resources with your very own students in mind.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. See full disclosure here. Melody Payne 7 Apr Reply. Lisha 28 Jan Reply. Many thanks. Melody Payne 28 Jan Reply. I hope it gives you some fun ideas to try in piano lessons. BernieA 30 Jul Reply. Melody Payne 30 Jul Reply. My pleasure, Bernie! Thanks for stopping by! Jarom Linton 17 Jun Reply. Melody Payne 18 Jun Reply. Rochelle 4 Jun Reply. Melody Payne 8 Jun Reply.

Ivy Baker 21 Dec Reply. Melody Payne 2 Jan Reply. Sophie Fredericks 20 Nov Reply. Melody Payne 22 Nov Reply. Saundra 4 Sep Reply. Melody Payne 5 Sep Reply. Saundra 5 Sep Reply.

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There are too many piano players struggling with their playing because they use the wrong fingers for particular keys. Fingered piano music marks each note with a number that corresponds to one of the five fingers. The numbers are written above or below the notes. These numbers tell you which finger to press for which key. Click here to learn about my top recommendation for learning to play piano.

In our next beginner piano lesson, we will learn about the piano keyboard. Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. These cookies do not store any personal information. Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies.

It is mandatory to procure user consent prior to running these cookies on your website. First of all, you will learn how to sit at the piano proper piano posture. Piano fingering for both hands are as follows: Thumb: 1 Index finger: 2 Middle finger: 3 Ring finger: 4 Pinky finger: 5 Click here to learn about my top recommendation for learning to play piano. Watch this series of lesson:. This website uses cookies to improve your experience.

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Necessary Necessary. Non-necessary Non-necessary. Have him name the key each time he places a bead. If you work with young students, you know that they need a lot of practice to learn which number goes with each finger. Print out this worksheet and then let your students grab a crayon in their favorite color.

Then just help your students color the finger that goes with the number listed beneath the hands. Fun Ideas for Active Learning: Point to a number on the worksheet and ask your student to play a white key with that finger. Then point to another number and ask the child to play a black key with the correct finger. There are a lot of variations if you ask for right hand or left hand, or if your students know the names of the keys and you call out a finger number and the letter name of a key.

For more music theory printables that are specific to the piano, see piano worksheets. Use these music worksheets to help kids understand the whole and half step pattern used to form major scales. When students understand the formula, they can play all the major scales and they can begin a more in depth analysis of the tonality within a key.

Scale Detective lets kids imagine that they are detectives searching for the clue to how scales are formed. I love that the worksheet includes a keyboard diagram above the notes of the scale. This diagram is especially helpful for beginners who may not yet be able to quickly identify whole and half steps while viewing music notation. They can refer to the piano keyboard diagram if needed to mark the half steps on the scale. Scales help us understand how one note relates to another within a key, so I encourage you to have your student practice playing scales and know the theory behind how they are formed with half steps and whole steps.

Click on the image to the right to print the older student version of the major scales activity. Another element that we spend a ton of time on in my studio is chords. When students have a solid understanding of chords—how to play them, how to build them and how to recognize them in their pieces, everything gets easier! When reading music, beginner students will often read individual notes, which makes practice cumbersome and time consuming.

But if a student knows chords well, the amount of time required to learn a new piece is significantly reduced. Chords are also a super easy way to harmonize a melody when kids make up their own songs or want to embellish a simple piece. The worksheet featured here helps kids master the formula for building major chords. The half step formula is listed at the top of the page and students just color in the keys needed to complete each chord.

This is one of my favorite music theory worksheets to use with older beginners. I like to help them learn their chords as quickly as possible so that they can start having fun with piano improv. This worksheet will help your students pay attention to the details of the symbols and learn how to draw them correctly.

Students first trace and then draw the brace, double bar line, bass clef, and treble clef. Then when they immediately draw it free hand much more accurately. The first time students draw a brace or a clef it will look wacky. Students often mix up the half and whole rests, and when they draw them it helps kids to better be able to distinguish the two when they are reading their sheet music.

The biggest monster for most students, however, is the quarter rest. That little squiggly line can cause a lot of frustration for kids. Help your students understand the difference between half steps and whole steps with these colorful printables.

The activity is easy to use because kids just look at the highlighted keys and then circle their answer. You might go one step further and ask your students to play the notes on the keyboard. Kids who are kinesthetic learners will especially benefit from playing and vocalizing the steps they see. I recommend that you begin with the keyboard worksheet and then introduce this worksheet that has notes on the staff. This worksheet can be used to build a foundation before delving into the identification of music intervals by type.

Help kids complete this worksheet by having them sit at the keyboard and play the notes. With time, students will be able to identify the steps without sitting at the piano, but this is a great way to help them visualize the distance between the notes. At times you may want to focus on just the treble clef or the bass clef , so I created a few worksheets that isolate each clef.

If your students struggle to identify the higher notes on the treble staff, you can use a treble printable to provide extra practice. Click the link to see more treble clef worksheets. The most common issue I see is kids that are great with the right hand notes, but really struggle to identify bass clef notes. You can view all bass clef worksheets by clicking bass clef worksheets. Do you have any older students who desperately need more practice with bass clef notes, but who resist those boring flashcards?

Try this fun Catch Bigfoot activity. To play, you give students a time to beat in order to catch Bigfoot. The worksheets in this section are very basic, which is ideal for young children. Revisit these introductory rhythm concepts often during the first few months of music study and your little students will have a solid rhythm foundation for their future studies.

Do you have really young students who need extra reinforcement with rhythm basics? I created Playing With Rhythm especially for those little ones. First review with your students what half notes and quarter notes look like. I usually point to a quarter note first and ask the kids to describe what it looks like.

Then I point to a half note and ask them to tell me what makes this note different from the first note. Then play! Kids just draw a line from the note to its numeric value. Your young students will have a blast if you give them bright crayons and encourage them to draw crazy, curly or zig zaggy hair.

The music alphabet is among the most basic of music theory concepts. Your older students will nail it down within 5 minutes, but younger kids will need to practice through both written and oral review. This first worksheet is for introducing the music alphabet.

You can show them the print out and explain that the music alphabet is just like the regular alphabet, only easier because it has just 7 letters. Invite your student to point to each letter while you recite the music alphabet. Next, hand the child a pencil and ask her to copy the music alphabet onto the lines.

At the next few lessons, continue reviewing the music alphabet by asking the student to verbalize it with you and also write it down. Use this worksheet to see if your students really do understand the music alphabet. Kids just look at each box and fill in the letter that comes next.

The trickiest is the letter G—many students will write H. Remind them that A comes after G in the music alphabet. Either of this worksheets can be used with manipulatives. You can use alphabet letter tiles or beads and ask the student to place a bead of the correct letter on the black space.

Adding this kind of variety to your lessons will help your students stay excited about piano. I just love holidays in the piano studio! Kids get super excited about the holiday events and the fun themes give us the perfect opportunity to explore new ways to learn and apply music theory.

Which of these free printable music theory worksheets are your favorites? What other fun ideas do you have for teaching theory? Leave a comment below to help out the other piano teachers in our online community. Like and share myfunpianostudio. Sign up for my email newsletter and get 2 free group lesson games that your students will love.

Click the button below to subscribe and get the 2 free group games. Thank you for this! My younger kids love doing worksheets with lots of bright colours like this! Thanks for these worksheets during this time. These worksheets will complement my temporary online instruction for K12 after-school lessons.

Thank you! I think its fantastic how you create or find all these resources just to hook kids into music. As a public educator with very little resources, I love the free worksheets and activity ideas. Thank you!!! I know what you mean, Teri. Wow, wow, WOW! Thank you so much! I have a new 5 year old starting tomorrow. Will laminate and use these. YOu made my day!! Thank you, Kristin, for a terrific site. I look forward to using these worksheets with my students. I think note names in general are hard for some students.

Thanks so much for sharing these learning activities! I know several of my students who will love the cute pictures that somehow make worksheets more fun! Thank you very much Kristin. They are very appreciated and my students will enjoy them. You are very kind! This is awesome!

Thank you so much for selflessly sharing these learning activities. Absolutely a helpful and fun way to learn music theories. Love it :. Thanks for being so kind. Hope your students have a lot of fun! Thank you so much for these fabulous worksheets!! It makes music theory cool to teach and learn. Your hard work is appreciated! Thanks, Roberta! You think like I do! Not many music teachers in South Africa shares this attitude! I hope I can get these downloaded!

Before Computer! Ilse, how wonderful that these worksheets are being used all the way in South Africa. Great job keeping the right frame of mind during so many years of teaching. Your students are lucky to have you!

Thank you Kristin! So kind and generous of you to make these worksheets and activities available to all. I can only imagine the time and effort you have put into all this! With appreciation, Peter. Thanks, Peter! It has been a lot of effort to make these, but worth it when they help kids make more progress and help other teachers save time on lesson prep.

Thanks for your kind comment. I loved it! I share all the comments about music theory being fun fun fun! Music theory can be very challenging. Thank you for these awesome Ideas! Hi, I was struggling hard to teach my son 6yo the music notes as I am not music trained. This site was an answered prayer! Thank You for your generous sharing for the spread of music education!! I teach mainly Visual Arts. Am very encouraged and inspired by blogs like yours and strive to give freely as well.

Lots of Gratitude from the heart! Angie, what a sweet comment. What a wonderful mother you are! Thank you so much for these worksheets! My son has autism, visual processing disorder and dyslexia and has been taking piano lessons for almost one year. He has been making steady progress, but we are still having trouble learning the note names.

Also each time a new concept is introduced, it is difficult for him to master it. These worksheets are a answer to prayer for us. We are making more progress since we found them than we had before. He is truly enjoying learning the piano and this has given him such a much needed confidence boost. That is wonderful! It warms my heart to hear that something I created has played a small role in helping your son with his musical education.

Thank you for helping kids learn music. My kids are missing out on band and basics. This makes it easier for me to teach them to read music and appreciate it. So glad these are helpful, Laura. These resources are very useful. Thank you very much Kristin for your very creative mind and generous heart to share all of your ideas with us.

May God bless you always for thinking others. I was wondering if you had any more worksheets on note values than listed here? Maybe some with time signatures or adding up the note values or creating rhythms. So glad that these worksheets are helpful! Thank you for making all of these great resources available!

I will be starting to teach lessons this summer after a hiatus. I am excited to try these ideas with my new students! Terima kasih Thank u from Indonesia. This is my first year being a music teacher in a formal school. These worksheets help me a lot. Do you have the answer keys to these worksheets? Their teacher wants them to practice note identification and I love these….

Thank yo!!! Thanks so much for these free printables!! I have a Life Skills music student who is moving to the far, far north of Canada where there is no school past Grade 8 age 13 or so. Thanks so much! You have really encouraged me to start a group pre-piano class.

I have some fun games and ideas to get it going. I also do a lot with movement since I am a retired general music teacher so I feel confident I have enough to get started! I am looking for a printable that I saw online yesterday. It was a fun way of illustrating the e,b,and f lines on the treble clef. Was this one on your printables? Hi Debbie! Yes, a link to the printable can be found on the Treble Clef Worksheets page.

Best wishes for you and your students! Thanks for your kind comment! Just found your website tonight while looking for resources to teach my children Music Theory for our homeschool. Thank you so much for developing and sharing all these pro tables and taking the time to explain how to use them! We will be using this resource a lot, and I will share it with others. I was pleasantly surprised when I found these helpful, colourful and creative worksheets.

Your site has great ideas for my special education students in middle school. They have just the right amount of examples to accommodate middle school students in my LIMMS classes! I loved them all! I only copied a few right now but perfect for my intervals, and scales lessons! The students will love them. I can also leave these for a sub to use as well! Jean, your kind comment made my day.

Keep up your great work! These are fabulous. I teach chorus in a k and i find them really helpful in my classes as well! You made these sheets right around when my baby was born and now she is 5 and using them. Oh how wonderful! These worksheets are really great! I know it took a lot of work and time to put these together. Thank you so much, these worksheets and tips are amazing and so helpful when still finding your teaching feet.

I teach grades and have found your worksheets extremely useful. They are set out very logically and the instructions are clear. Thank you for your hard work — it is truly appreciated.

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What is a piano chord? What are piano intervals? A half-step is the distance from one key to the next key immediately to its right or left. A whole-step is the distance of two half-steps. Common intervals. A common interval used in piano chords is the major third, which is the distance of two whole-steps or four half-steps.

What are the standard piano notes? What are sharp and flat piano notes? What are major piano chords? Pro Tip: Listen to your favorite rock songs! How do you play a major chord on the piano? Common major piano chords include: C major C. What are intervals called in a major scale? What are minor piano chords? D - F -A Eb minor Ebm. What are diminished piano chords? Are diminished chords used in rock songs? Common diminished piano chords include: C diminished Cdim.

C - Eb - Gb C diminished C dim. C - E - G D diminished Ddim. D - F - Ab D diminished D dim. D - F - A E diminished Edim. E - G - Bb F diminished Fdim. F - Ab - Cb F diminished F dim. F - A - C G diminished Gdim. G - Bb - Db G diminished G dim. G - B - D A diminished Adim. A - C - Eb A diminished A dim. A - C - E B diminished Bdim. Get realtime performance feedback You don't have to practice piano on your own. Check out the School of Rock Method.

What are augmented piano chords? Common augmented piano chords include: C augmented Caug. C - E - G C augmented C aug. C - E - G D augmented Daug. D - F - A D augmented D aug. D - F - A E augmented Eaug. E - G - B F augmented Faug. F - A - C F augmented F aug. F - A - C G augmented Gaug.

G - B - D G augmented G aug. G - B - D A augmented Aaug. A - C - E A augmented A aug. A - C - E B augmented Baug. Ready to play Piano? Related Articles. Qual a Melhor Idade para Aprender Piano? Stay in the know Submit. As our collection of homework pages grow you will have access to pencil and paper activities, games, and puzzles that can be used with kids of all ages.

But there is one, tiny, little hiccup: home practice! Our first three homework pages are available today and include: Snap That: This one-player game is perfect for students who crave a little action. With the homework page, a few coins, and a die, Level 2 piano students will reinforce their understanding of key signatures.

Secret Keys: This detective-themed game is designed for primer-level piano students who need a little bit of extra practice with notes in Middle C position. Can your students color the keys and uncover the clue? An Eye For Intervals: Do your piano students spend too much time note crunching and not enough time reading intervals? In this activity your students will reinforce their ability to recognize intervals of a 3rd, 4th, and 5th. Share

The definitive handbook for the effective use of theory worksheets—with engaging companion activities and over 50 free printables that make learning theory fun.

Piano homework beginners 679
Piano homework beginners Look at their jaw. This makes it easier for me to teach them to read music and appreciate it. Music notation uses symbols to represent the various audible components that make up a song. Try it today: Print Polka Dot Notes and play the fun hands on activity described above that helps kids free resume rewrite note names. I have been looking for something to add a little fun to my studio! Help students become proficient at classifying whole and half steps on the staff with the second worksheet from this section.
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I made Music Interval Stars for kids who are just getting introduced to music intervals. Keep in mind that you can start introducing intervals even to very young students. I first show simple examples—the Music Interval Stars worksheet works great. We learn how to count the lines and spaces to give the interval a name. For your more advanced students, you can use the theory printables to your right to help them identify music intervals by size and type.

Fun Ideas for Active Learning:. Now let me share with you a great interval activity that will help your students with ear training and help them better understand how music works: Print out one of these worksheets and have your student identify all the intervals. Then highlight three or four of them and ask your student to play the notes and describe the sounds. First play the notes melodically and then harmonically. Ask leading questions to help your student get really specific in describing the characteristics of the sound.

Does it sound happy or sad? Calm or tense? Do you think these notes could be used to end a song, or does it sound like the notes need resolution? Ask your students to go home and compose a short song that contains all of the intervals you highlighted and discussed on the worksheet. Before turning them loose, you might help them analyze which of the intervals could be used for an interesting introduction, and which would give their piece a good conclusion.

This simple activity will get you big results, and I encourage you to print out one of the worksheets today and try it with your students. No collection of music theory exercises would be complete without a circle of fifths worksheet.

The circle of fifths is an essential tool for students learning the number of sharps or flats in each key. The circle of fifths becomes even more important when students begin creating their own music because it provides a quick visual representation of the way chords flow.

This particular printable is one of the most popular music theory worksheets on my website. To complete the worksheet, students first go around the circle and write the name of each key. Then students can go back through and practice writing the sharps and flats to complete each key signature. You can remind them to pay special attention to the correct placement of the sharps and flats.

Students just look at the number of sharps or flats listed and then write in the name of the corresponding key. After they have completed the exercise, take the time to help them understand the application of the circle of fifths. Discuss how it helps us quickly identify the key signature at the beginning of a piece and how it helps us understand cadences and chord progressions.

Sit near the piano and all you need is the printout, a marker, a die, and a token for each player. Place all tokens on the same wedge and player 1 rolls the die and moves that number of spaces around the circle.

The student then has 30 seconds to play the keynote that corresponds to that section of the circle. If she answers correctly, she gets to write her initials in the space. The next player then takes a turn to roll the die. If his token lands on a space that already has initials, he looses that turn.

Play continues until every wedge has a set of initials. The player who initialed the most sections of the circle of fifths wins. I created a couple more variations on these activities so that you can find the one that best fits your goals for teaching your students. There are music worksheets that focus on treble clef key signatures and others that focus on bass clef key signatures so that you can help your students become proficient with both clefs—especially when it comes to writing the sharps and flats on the correct line or space.

To see these printables, visit circle of fifths worksheets. Print out Give It Your Best Shot and use it alongside a fun run around activity to get your students off the bench for a couple minutes. Grab the printed worksheet, a basket and three beanbags or small balls. Hand your student the worksheet and ask him to give it his best shot and see if he can get a perfect score. If the student misses an answer or two, help him understand how to get the correct answers and then let him have a turn tossing the beanbags or balls into the basket.

Your student will have a blast and will probably remember this rhythm lesson years later! Most rhythm worksheets can be used to help kids internalize rhythm. You can do the same with your students by asking them to tap the rhythms on the worksheets with you.

Add some variety by asking them to tap on a drum or tambourine. A great way to help kids understand time signatures is to have them look at a measure and then decide what time signature should be used with that measure. Time Signature Cookies gives kids practice doing just that!

Each cookie displays a time signature that matches one of the example measures. You can have your students draw a line from the cookie to the correct measure, or you can ask them to write in the time signature for each measure. If you have any students who miss several answers, go through the assignment with them and help them write the counts beneath each note or rest.

Missing Bar Lines helps kids understand how music is organized into measures. The bar lines are missing, so students look at the time signature and count the beats to add the missing bar lines. Turn this worksheet into a fun manipulative activity by giving your students pull-apart licorice or pretzel sticks.

They can use the snacks to add the bar lines. The activities in this section are specific to the piano. Just print it out and have your piano students write the name of each highlighted key. With young students, always ask them to tell you if the highlighted key is near a black key or a white key. This will speed up their mastery of the names of the keys.

Fun Ideas for Active Learning: After completing the worksheet, ask kids to find and play each note on the piano. Or give the child a handful of blue, green, and orange beads and ask him to place a bead on the piano key that matches the highlighted keys on the printable.

Have him name the key each time he places a bead. If you work with young students, you know that they need a lot of practice to learn which number goes with each finger. Print out this worksheet and then let your students grab a crayon in their favorite color. Then just help your students color the finger that goes with the number listed beneath the hands. Fun Ideas for Active Learning: Point to a number on the worksheet and ask your student to play a white key with that finger.

Then point to another number and ask the child to play a black key with the correct finger. There are a lot of variations if you ask for right hand or left hand, or if your students know the names of the keys and you call out a finger number and the letter name of a key. For more music theory printables that are specific to the piano, see piano worksheets. Use these music worksheets to help kids understand the whole and half step pattern used to form major scales.

When students understand the formula, they can play all the major scales and they can begin a more in depth analysis of the tonality within a key. Scale Detective lets kids imagine that they are detectives searching for the clue to how scales are formed. I love that the worksheet includes a keyboard diagram above the notes of the scale.

This diagram is especially helpful for beginners who may not yet be able to quickly identify whole and half steps while viewing music notation. They can refer to the piano keyboard diagram if needed to mark the half steps on the scale. Scales help us understand how one note relates to another within a key, so I encourage you to have your student practice playing scales and know the theory behind how they are formed with half steps and whole steps.

Click on the image to the right to print the older student version of the major scales activity. Another element that we spend a ton of time on in my studio is chords. When students have a solid understanding of chords—how to play them, how to build them and how to recognize them in their pieces, everything gets easier! When reading music, beginner students will often read individual notes, which makes practice cumbersome and time consuming.

But if a student knows chords well, the amount of time required to learn a new piece is significantly reduced. Chords are also a super easy way to harmonize a melody when kids make up their own songs or want to embellish a simple piece. The worksheet featured here helps kids master the formula for building major chords. The half step formula is listed at the top of the page and students just color in the keys needed to complete each chord.

This is one of my favorite music theory worksheets to use with older beginners. I like to help them learn their chords as quickly as possible so that they can start having fun with piano improv. This worksheet will help your students pay attention to the details of the symbols and learn how to draw them correctly. Students first trace and then draw the brace, double bar line, bass clef, and treble clef.

Then when they immediately draw it free hand much more accurately. The first time students draw a brace or a clef it will look wacky. Students often mix up the half and whole rests, and when they draw them it helps kids to better be able to distinguish the two when they are reading their sheet music. The biggest monster for most students, however, is the quarter rest.

That little squiggly line can cause a lot of frustration for kids. Help your students understand the difference between half steps and whole steps with these colorful printables. The activity is easy to use because kids just look at the highlighted keys and then circle their answer. You might go one step further and ask your students to play the notes on the keyboard. Kids who are kinesthetic learners will especially benefit from playing and vocalizing the steps they see.

I recommend that you begin with the keyboard worksheet and then introduce this worksheet that has notes on the staff. This worksheet can be used to build a foundation before delving into the identification of music intervals by type. Help kids complete this worksheet by having them sit at the keyboard and play the notes. With time, students will be able to identify the steps without sitting at the piano, but this is a great way to help them visualize the distance between the notes.

At times you may want to focus on just the treble clef or the bass clef , so I created a few worksheets that isolate each clef. If your students struggle to identify the higher notes on the treble staff, you can use a treble printable to provide extra practice. Click the link to see more treble clef worksheets. The most common issue I see is kids that are great with the right hand notes, but really struggle to identify bass clef notes. You can view all bass clef worksheets by clicking bass clef worksheets.

Do you have any older students who desperately need more practice with bass clef notes, but who resist those boring flashcards? Try this fun Catch Bigfoot activity. To play, you give students a time to beat in order to catch Bigfoot. The worksheets in this section are very basic, which is ideal for young children.

Revisit these introductory rhythm concepts often during the first few months of music study and your little students will have a solid rhythm foundation for their future studies. Do you have really young students who need extra reinforcement with rhythm basics? I created Playing With Rhythm especially for those little ones.

First review with your students what half notes and quarter notes look like. I usually point to a quarter note first and ask the kids to describe what it looks like. Then I point to a half note and ask them to tell me what makes this note different from the first note.

Then play! Kids just draw a line from the note to its numeric value. Your young students will have a blast if you give them bright crayons and encourage them to draw crazy, curly or zig zaggy hair. The music alphabet is among the most basic of music theory concepts. Your older students will nail it down within 5 minutes, but younger kids will need to practice through both written and oral review. This first worksheet is for introducing the music alphabet.

You can show them the print out and explain that the music alphabet is just like the regular alphabet, only easier because it has just 7 letters. Invite your student to point to each letter while you recite the music alphabet.

Next, hand the child a pencil and ask her to copy the music alphabet onto the lines. At the next few lessons, continue reviewing the music alphabet by asking the student to verbalize it with you and also write it down. Use this worksheet to see if your students really do understand the music alphabet. Kids just look at each box and fill in the letter that comes next. The trickiest is the letter G—many students will write H. Remind them that A comes after G in the music alphabet.

Either of this worksheets can be used with manipulatives. You can use alphabet letter tiles or beads and ask the student to place a bead of the correct letter on the black space. Adding this kind of variety to your lessons will help your students stay excited about piano. I just love holidays in the piano studio! Kids get super excited about the holiday events and the fun themes give us the perfect opportunity to explore new ways to learn and apply music theory.

Which of these free printable music theory worksheets are your favorites? What other fun ideas do you have for teaching theory? Leave a comment below to help out the other piano teachers in our online community. Like and share myfunpianostudio. Sign up for my email newsletter and get 2 free group lesson games that your students will love. Click the button below to subscribe and get the 2 free group games.

Thank you for this! My younger kids love doing worksheets with lots of bright colours like this! Thanks for these worksheets during this time. These worksheets will complement my temporary online instruction for K12 after-school lessons. Thank you! I think its fantastic how you create or find all these resources just to hook kids into music.

As a public educator with very little resources, I love the free worksheets and activity ideas. Thank you!!! I know what you mean, Teri. Wow, wow, WOW! Thank you so much! I have a new 5 year old starting tomorrow. Will laminate and use these. YOu made my day!! Thank you, Kristin, for a terrific site.

I look forward to using these worksheets with my students. I think note names in general are hard for some students. Thanks so much for sharing these learning activities! I know several of my students who will love the cute pictures that somehow make worksheets more fun! Thank you very much Kristin.

They are very appreciated and my students will enjoy them. You are very kind! This is awesome! Thank you so much for selflessly sharing these learning activities. Absolutely a helpful and fun way to learn music theories. Love it :. Thanks for being so kind. Hope your students have a lot of fun! Thank you so much for these fabulous worksheets!! It makes music theory cool to teach and learn. Your hard work is appreciated!

Thanks, Roberta! You think like I do! Not many music teachers in South Africa shares this attitude! I hope I can get these downloaded! Before Computer! Ilse, how wonderful that these worksheets are being used all the way in South Africa. Great job keeping the right frame of mind during so many years of teaching. Your students are lucky to have you! Thank you Kristin! So kind and generous of you to make these worksheets and activities available to all.

I can only imagine the time and effort you have put into all this! With appreciation, Peter. Thanks, Peter! It has been a lot of effort to make these, but worth it when they help kids make more progress and help other teachers save time on lesson prep. Thanks for your kind comment. I loved it! I share all the comments about music theory being fun fun fun!

Music theory can be very challenging. Thank you for these awesome Ideas! Hi, I was struggling hard to teach my son 6yo the music notes as I am not music trained. This site was an answered prayer! Thank You for your generous sharing for the spread of music education!! I teach mainly Visual Arts. Am very encouraged and inspired by blogs like yours and strive to give freely as well. Lots of Gratitude from the heart! Angie, what a sweet comment. What a wonderful mother you are! Thank you so much for these worksheets!

My son has autism, visual processing disorder and dyslexia and has been taking piano lessons for almost one year. He has been making steady progress, but we are still having trouble learning the note names. What do I use the next few weeks to review concepts and introduce a few more musical elements to my beginners, as we continue working through the Lesson and Writing books?

The Beginning Piano Mega Bundle! It includes tons of worksheets, coloring pages, games, activities, and more. Give your youngest beginners a solid foundation from the very beginning of piano lessons. What do you do during a first piano lesson? Leave a comment below! I especially like how you immediately work out if children are a good fit for you by following directions. What I learn from that 20 minute session really helps me to see right away if we would work together well. Thanks so much for your comment, Leeanne!

Thanks Melody. I could always learn something new from others. Thank you. My daughter wants to start playing more piano this year so we need to find a great teacher in the area. Hope this helps, and best wishes to your daughter as she begins piano lessons! I love that you set up expectations from the beginning. That and get the student playing lovely music from the beginning!

Those are things I do at my first lesson as well. Great article! I am also going to look up Billy Boy. I loved singing that song in elementary music class as a child! Thanks, Rochelle! I have found over the years that the more quickly I set up expectations, the better our piano-student-parent relationship goes. Then there are no surprises!

My niece really wants to learn how to play the piano this upcoming year. I liked that you pointed out that my sister should find her a teacher that makes her feel at ease. Stress seems like it would make it harder for my niece to learn and have fun.

The first piano teacher that a child has is THE most important piano teacher for that child. That teacher can help the child love music and love learning, or that teacher could do the opposite. There are so many ways that we can make our prospective students feel at ease, and that always builds trust and helps the lessons go much more smoothly.

Best wishes to your sister and niece in finding the perfect teacher, Ivy! So helpful, as always Melody. I am not familiar with Billy Boy so am going to look into it now. The kids love standing up and looking into the piano and seeing how it works before they play.

Thanks so much, Sophie! Do you have an assignment sheet form that is used for your email after the lesson? I was thrilled to read this post. I have been teaching piano for many years and for my beginners have drawn from a lot of teaching resources. I was so amazed reading that I do so many of the same things. The best piece ever and instantly they love playing the piano! Have used it for over 35 years!

I really enjoyed the article, made me feel like I am doing things right! I have 3 daughters who also teach and they have adopted my first lesson as well, had to share with them. I also have many of your theory and game resources and enjoy them. Thank you so much for your comments, Cindy! LFO definitely was a genius at writing those perfect teaching pieces. Thank you again for your kind words, and happy teaching to you and your daughters!

I always find something helpful and encouraging. Thank you for sharing your expertise with your fellow teachers! Thanks so much for reading, Rebecca! You just made my day. Have a wonderful week of lessons, and happy teaching! I want to make your life as a music teacher easier by writing and sharing helpful and relevant music teaching articles, and by creating educational resources with your very own students in mind.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. See full disclosure here. Melody Payne 7 Apr Reply. Lisha 28 Jan Reply. Many thanks. Melody Payne 28 Jan Reply. I hope it gives you some fun ideas to try in piano lessons. BernieA 30 Jul Reply. Melody Payne 30 Jul Reply. My pleasure, Bernie!