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Catullus , Carmen , addressed to his deceased brother. Anthem of Imperium Europa. Ave Imperator, morituri te salutant. A salute and plea for mercy recorded on one occasion by naumachiarii —captives and criminals fated to die fighting during mock naval encounters. Later versions included a variant of "We who are about to die", and this translation is sometimes aided by changing the Latin to nos morituri te salutamus. Roman Catholic prayer of intercession asking St.

Mary, the Mother of Jesus Christ to pray for the petitioner. Wise only in appearance. From Erasmus 's collection of Adages. Blessed Virgin Mary. The genitive , Beatae Mariae Virginis BMV , occurs often as well, appearing with such words as horae hours , litaniae litanies and officium office.

A Beatitude from Matthew in the Vulgate : beati pauperes spiritu, quoniam ipsorum est regnum caelorum "Blessed in spirit [are] the poor, for theirs is the kingdom of the heavens". Inscription above the entrance to St. From Proverbs ; set to music in a motet of the same name by Orlando di Lasso. Bella, mulier qui hominum allicit et accipit eos per fortis. Latin proverb [ citation needed ].

Originally from Ovid , Heroides She begs him to stay out of danger, but he was in fact the first Greek to die at Troy. Also used of the Habsburg marriages of and , written as bella gerant alii, tu felix Austria nube let others wage war; you, happy Austria, marry. Said by King Matthias. Motto of the House of d'Udekem d'Acoz [ nl ].

A phrase used by Thomas Hobbes to describe the state of nature. All-out war without restraint as Romans practiced against groups they considered to be barbarians. Biblia pauperum. A play on " cogito ergo sum ", "I think therefore I am". Medical shorthand for "twice a day".

In other words, "well-intentioned", "fairly". In modern contexts, often has connotations of "genuinely" or "sincerely". Bona fides is not the plural which would be bonis fidebus , but the nominative , and means simply "good faith". Opposite of mala fide. In law, if a person dying has goods, or good debts, in another diocese or jurisdiction within that province, besides his goods in the diocese where he dies, amounting to a certain minimum value, he is said to have bona notabilia ; in which case, the probat of his will belongs to the archbishop of that province.

A jury or assize of countrymen, or good neighbors. United Kingdom legal term for ownerless property that passes to The Crown. Tiberius reportedly said this to his regional commanders, as a warning against taxing the populace excessively.

Or "general welfare". Refers to what benefits a society, as opposed to bonum commune hominis , which refers to what is good for an individual. In the film Hot Fuzz , this phrase is chanted by an assembled group of people, in which context it is deliberately similar to another phrase that is repeated throughout the film, which is The Greater Good.

Refers to an individual's happiness, which is not "common" in that it serves everyone, but in that individuals tend to be able to find happiness in similar things. John of Cornwall ca. It turns out that the original text said in diebus illis [in those days], which the scribe misread as in die busillis [at the day of Busillis ], believing this was a famous man. Contemporary critics applied this epithet to both of Turner's Regulus and See hypergraphia.

Used by the Romans to describe the aftermath of the Battle of the Catalaunian Plains. Caedite eos. Novit enim Dominus qui sunt eius. Caelum non animum mutant qui trans mare currunt. Hexameter by Horace Epistula XI. Caesar non supra grammaticos. Political power is limited; it does not include power over grammar.

The pen is mightier than the sword. An optical device used in drawing, and an ancestor of modern photography. The source of the word camera. Perfectly correct Latin sentence usually reported as funny from modern Italians because the same exact words, in today's dialect of Rome, mean "A black dog eats a beautiful peach" , which has a ridiculously different meaning.

Refers to a situation where nobody is safe from anybody, each man for himself. Original name of the video game Bully. Written by Tacitus in The Histories to describe Galba as emperor. So aggrandized as to be beyond practical earthly reach or understanding from Virgil 's Aeneid and the shorter form appears in John Locke 's Two Treatises of Government.

Originally an alchemical reference to the dead head or worthless residue left over from a reaction. Also used to refer to a freeloader or worthless element. It implies a command to love as Christ loved. Motto of St. Pope Benedict XVI 's third encyclical [20].

An exhortation to live for today. From Horace , Odes I, Carpere refers to plucking of flowers or fruit. The phrase collige virgo rosas has a similar sense. An exhortation to make good use of the night, often used when carpe diem , q. Carthago delenda est. The Roman senator Cato the Elder ended every speech after the Second Punic War with ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam , literally "For the rest, I am of the opinion that Carthage is to be destroyed.

Spoken aloud in some British public paid schools by pupils to warn each other of impending authority. Earliest written example is in the Satyricon of Petronius, circa 1st century C. The purchaser is responsible for checking whether the goods suit his need. Phrases modeled on this one replace emptor with lector , subscriptor , venditor , utilitor : "reader", "signer", "seller", "user". It is a counter to caveat emptor and suggests that sellers can also be deceived in a market transaction.

This forces the seller to take responsibility for the product and discourages sellers from selling products of unreasonable quality. Former motto of the Territory of Wyoming. See also Toga Roman military. Or simply "faster than cooking asparagus".

A variant of the Roman phrase velocius quam asparagi coquantur , using a different adverb and an alternative mood and spelling of coquere. In law, it is a return made by the sheriff, upon a capias , or other process to the like purpose; signifying, that he has taken the body of the party.

See also habeas corpus. A rule of law becomes ineffective when the reason for its application has ceased to exist or does not correspond to the reality anymore. By Gratian. The form of a pardon for killing another man in self-defence see manslaughter. The form of a pardon of a man who is outlawed. Also called perdonatio utlagariae. Cicero pro domo sua [ it ]. Cicero 's speech in 57 BC to regain his confiscated house. In logic, begging the question , a fallacy involving the presupposition of a proposition in one of the premises see petitio principii.

In science, a positive feedback loop. In economics, a counterpart to the virtuous circle. Is a phrase used in Cicero's In Verrem as a plea for the legal rights of a Roman citizen. A writ whereby the king of England could command the justice to admit one's claim by an attorney, who being employed in the king's service, cannot come in person.

A legal action for trespass to land; so called, because the writ demands the person summoned to answer wherefore he broke the close quare clausum fregit , i. The means of discovering hidden or mysterious meanings in texts, particularly applied in theology and alchemy. In law, a writ directed to the bishop, for the admitting a clerk to a benefice upon a ne admittas , tried, and found for the party who procures the writ.

In law, a writ for the delivery of a clerk out of prison, who is imprisoned upon the breach of statute merchant. In law, a writ for the delivery of a clerk to his ordinary, that was formerly convicted of felony; by reason that his ordinary did not challenge him according to the privilege of clerks.

In law, a writ directed to the bailiffs, etc. The official code of canon law in the Roman Catholic Church cf. Corpus Iuris Canonici. Cogitationis poenam nemo patitur. Aborting sexual intercourse prior to ejaculation —the only permitted form of birth control in some religions.

A medical euphemism for the doggy-style sexual position. Exhortation to enjoy fully the youth, similar to Carpe diem , from "De rosis nascentibus" also titled "Idyllium de rosis" , attributed to Ausonius or Virgil. It is frequently abbreviated comb. It is used in the life sciences literature when a new name is introduced, e.

Klebsiella granulomatis comb. One year with another; on an average. A term frequently used among philosophical and other writers, implying some medium, or mean relation between several places; one place with another; on a medium. Describes someone of sound mind. Sometimes used ironically. Also a legal principle, non compos mentis not in control of one's faculties , used to describe an insane person. Motto of the University of Waterloo. Motto of Montreal. It is also the Bank of Montreal coat of arms and motto.

Motto of Merchant Taylors' School, Northwood. The quod here is ambiguous: it may be the relative pronoun or a conjunction. A required, indispensable condition. Commonly mistakenly rendered with conditio "seasoning" or "preserving" in place of condicio "arrangement" or "condition". The abbreviation cf. Congregatio Sanctissimi Redemptoris C. Or "with united powers". Sometimes rendered conjunctis viribus. Motto of Queen Mary, University of London.

Where there are no specific laws, the matter should be decided by custom; [24] established customs have the force of laws. The last words of Jesus on the cross in the Latin translation of John Despising the secular world. The monk or philosopher 's rejection of a mundane life and worldly values. Especially in civil law jurisdictions , said of an understanding of a statute that directly contradicts its wording and thus is neither valid by interpretation nor by analogy.

In contract law , the doctrine of contractual interpretation which provides that an ambiguous term will be construed against the party that imposed its inclusion in the contract — or, more accurately, against the interests of the party who imposed it. No herb or sage grows in the gardens against the power of death. A thing or idea that would embody a contradiction , for example, payment for a gift, or a circle with corners. The fallacy of proposing such a thing.

From Augustine 's Confessions , referring to a prescribed method of prayer: having a "heart to heart" with God. Commonly used in reference to a later quote by Cardinal John Henry Newman. A motto of Newman Clubs. Your choice is between The Heart Moral Values, Duty, Loyalty or Death to no longer matter, to no longer be respected as person of integrity. John Calvin 's personal motto, also adopted by Calvin College. A popular school motto.

Often used as names for religious and other organisations such as the Pontifical Council Cor Unum. A phrase from Christian theology which summarizes the idea of Christians living in the presence of, under the authority of, and to the honor and glory of God ; see also coram Deo disambiguation. Two kinds of writs of error. The name of a feast in the Roman Catholic Church commemorating the Eucharist. It is also the name of a city in Texas, Corpus Christi, Texas , the name of Colleges at Oxford and Cambridge universities, and a controversial play.

The fact that a crime has been committed, a necessary factor in convicting someone of having committed that crime; if there was no crime, there can not have been a criminal. The official compilation of canon law in the Roman Catholic Church cf. Codex Iuris Canonici. Corpus Iuris Civilis. The body of Roman or civil law. A person or thing fit only to be the object of an experiment, as in the phrase 'Fiat experimentum in corpore vili. Motto of the fictional Mayor 's office in The Simpsons.

May he who has never loved before, love tomorrow; And may he who has loved, love tomorrow as well. The refrain from the 'Pervigilium Veneris', a poem which describes a three-day holiday in the cult of Venus, located somewhere in Sicily, involving the whole town in religious festivities joined with a deep sense of nature and Venus as the "procreatrix", the life-giving force behind the natural world.

A concept about creation, often used in a theological or philosophical context. Also known as the 'First Cause' argument in philosophy of religion. Contrasted with creatio ex materia. The first words of the Nicene Creed and the Apostles' Creed. A very common misquote of Tertullian 's et mortuus est Dei Filius prorsus credibile quia ineptum est and the Son of God is dead: in short, it is credible because it is unfitting , meaning that it is so absurd to say that God's son has died that it would have to be a matter of belief, rather than reason.

The misquoted phrase, however, is commonly used to mock the dogmatic beliefs of the religious see fideism. This phrase is commonly shortened to credo quia absurdum , and is also sometimes rendered credo quia impossibile est I believe it because it is impossible or, as Darwin used it in his autobiography, credo quia incredibile. A motto of St Anselm, used as the motto of St.

Anselm Hall , Manchester. Motto of Cheverus High School. Motto of the University of Chicago. Often rendered in English as "Let knowledge grow from more to more, And so be human life enriched," so as to achieve an iambic meter. Motto of James Cook University. Motto of Claremont McKenna College. From Lucretius ' De rerum natura book VI, where it refers in context to the motion of a thunderbolt across the sky, which acquires power and momentum as it goes. This metaphor was adapted as the state motto of New Mexico adopted in as the territory's motto, and kept in when New Mexico received statehood and is seen on the seal.

Also the motto of Rocky Mount, Virginia. Also the motto of the Crime Syndicate of America , a fictional supervillain group. The opposite is cui malo Bad for whom? Short for cui prodest scelus is fecit for whom the crime advances, he has done it in Seneca 's Medea. Thus, the murderer is often the one who gains by the murder cf. Whose the land is, all the way to the sky and to the underworld is his.

First coined by Accursius of Bologna in the 13th century. A Roman legal principle of property law that is no longer observed in most situations today. Less literally, "For whosoever owns the soil, it is theirs up to the sky and down to the depths.

The privilege of a ruler to choose the religion of his subjects. A regional prince's ability to choose his people's religion was established at the Peace of Augsburg in Cicero , Philippica XII, 5. Also "blame" or " guilt ". In law, an act of neglect. In general, guilt, sin, or a fault. See also mea culpa.

From the Bible. Occurs in Matthew and Luke Fallacy of assuming that correlation implies causation. The standard formula for academic Latin honors in the United States. Greater honors include magna cum laude and summa cum laude. Movement from Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky.

Copyright notice used in 16th-century England, used for comic effect in The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Motto of University College London. The question attributed to Anselm in his work of by this name, wherein he reflects on why the Christ of Christianity must be both fully Divine and fully Human. Often translated "why did God become Man? An exhortation to physicians , or experts in general, to deal with their own problems before addressing those of others.

Motto of the City of Westminster. Motto of Western Australia. A traditional greeting of Czech brewers. Also da mihi facta, dabo tibi ius plural "facta" facts for the singular "factum". A legal principle of Roman law that parties to a suit should present the facts and the judge will rule on the law that governs them.

Related to iura novit curia the court knows the law. Paraphrase of Quintilianus , De Institutione Oratoria , Book 10, Chapter 1, Modesto tamen et circumspecto iudicio de tantis viris pronuntiandum est, ne, quod plerisque accidit, damnent quae non intellegunt. Yet students must pronounce with diffidence and circumspection on the merits of such illustrious characters, lest, as is the case with many, they condemn what they do not understand. John Selby Watson. The ancient Roman custom by which it was pretended that disgraced Romans, especially former emperors , never existed, by eliminating all records and likenesses of them.

Meaning a loss that results from no one's wrongdoing. In Roman law , a person is not responsible for unintended, consequential injury to another that results from a lawful act. This protection does not necessarily apply to unintended damage caused by one's negligence or folly. In law, a de bene esse deposition is used to preserve the testimony of a witness who is expected not to be available to appear at trial and be cross-examined.

In law, trespass de bonis asportatis was the traditional name for larceny , i. Said of something that is the actual state of affairs , in contrast to something's legal or official standing, which is described as de jure. De facto refers to "the way things really are" rather than what is officially presented as the fact of the matter in question. A clerk of a court makes this declaration when he is appointed, by which he promises to perform his duties faithfully as a servant of the court.

Describes an oath taken to faithfully administer the duties of a job or office, like that taken by a court reporter. Less literally, "there is no accounting for taste", because they are judged subjectively and not objectively: everyone has his own and none deserve preeminence. The complete phrase is "de gustibus et coloribus non est disputandum" "when we talk about tastes and colours there is nothing to be disputed".

Probably of Scholastic origin; see Wiktionary. In other contexts, it can mean "according to law", "by right", and "legally". A court does not care about small, trivial things. A case must have some importance in order for a court to hear it. See "de minimis non curat praetor". Also, "the chief magistrate does not concern himself with trifles.

Sometimes rex king or lex law is used in place of praetor. De minimis is a legal phrase referring to things unworthy of the law's attention. In legal contexts, this quotation is used with the opposite meaning: defamation of a deceased person is not a crime. In other contexts, it refers to taboos against criticizing the recently deceased. Thus: "their story is our story". Originally it referred to the end of Rome's dominance.

Now often used when comparing any current situation to a past story or event. In law, a trial de novo is a retrial. In biology, de novo means newly synthesized , and a de novo mutation is a mutation that neither parent possessed or transmitted.

In economics, de novo refers to newly founded companies, and de novo banks are state banks that have been in operation for five years or less. The Italian scholar Giovanni Pico della Mirandola of the 15th century wrote the De omni re scibili "concerning every knowable thing" part, and a wag added et quibusdam aliis "and even certain other things".

Loosely, "to liberate the oppressed". Motto of the Worshipful Company of Barbers. Meaning from out of the depths of misery or dejection. From the Latin translation of the Vulgate Bible of Psalm , of which it is a traditional title in Roman Catholic liturgy. In logic, de dicto statements regarding the truth of a proposition are distinguished from de re statements regarding the properties of a thing itself.

Used in genealogical records, often abbreviated as d. Used in genealogical records in cases of nobility or other hereditary titles, often abbreviated as d. A phrase from the Aeneid of Virgil. Inscription on British one-pound coins. Originally inscribed on coins of the 17th century, it refers to the inscribed edge of the coin as a protection against the clipping of its precious metal.

Part of the full style of a monarch historically considered to be ruling by divine right , notably in the style of the English and British monarch since Dei gratia regina. In Catholic theology, pleasure taken in a sinful thought or imagination, such as brooding on sexual images. As voluntary and complacent erotic fantasizing, without attempt to suppress such thoughts, it is distinct from actual sexual desire. A legal principle whereby one to whom certain powers were delegated may not ipso facto re-delegate them to another.

A distinction may be had between delegated powers and the additional power to re-delegate them. Motto of Methodist Ladies' College, Melbourne. Motto of Monaco and its monarch , which is inscribed on the royal arms. Motto of the Epsom College in Surrey , England. Deo optimo maximo DOM. Derived from the pagan Iupiter optimo maximo "to the best and greatest Jupiter ". Motto of Scotch College Melbourne.

This was often used in conjunction with a signature at the end of letters. It was used in order to signify that "God willing" this letter will get to you safely, "God willing" the contents of this letter come true. As an abbreviation simply "D. The motto of Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.

Down the rabbit hole. See Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Famous lines and expressions. From Hebrews Adopted as the motto of the Order of Canada. For other meanings see Deus caritas est disambiguation. A contrived or artificial solution, usually to a literary plot. The device is most commonly associated with Euripides. The motto of The Catholic University of America. The principal motto of Scottish Rite Freemasonry.

See also Dieu et mon droit. The principal slogan of the Crusades. A recent academic substitution for the spacious and inconvenient phrase "as previously stated". Literally, has been stated. Compare also "dicta prius"; literally, said previously. A dicto simpliciter occurs when an acceptable exception is ignored or eliminated. For example, the appropriateness of using opiates is contingent on suffering extreme pain. To justify the recreational use of opiates by referring to a cancer patient or to justify arresting said patient by comparing him to the recreational user would be a dicto simpliciter.

Motto of the London Stock Exchange. From the Roman Emperor Titus. Recorded in the biography of him by Suetonius in Lives of the Twelve Caesars. Reference to the Judgment Day in Christian eschatology. Days under common law traditionally Sunday , during which no legal process can be served and any legal judgment is invalid. First entry in Annales Cambriae , for the year In Classical Latin , "I arrange".

In other words, the gods have ideas different to those of mortals, and so events do not always occur in the way persons wish them to. Confer Virgil , Aeneid , 2: Also confer "Man proposes and God disposes" and "My Thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways My ways", Isaiah 55, Refers to the Manes , i.

Roman spirits of the dead. Loosely, "to the memory of". A conventional pagan inscription preceding the name of the deceased on his tombstone; often shortened to dis manibus D. Preceded in some earlier monuments by hic situs est H. Attributed to St. Edmund of Abingdon. First seen in Isidoro de Sevilla. Paraphrased from Horace , Satires , 1, 4, 62, where it is written " disiecti membra poetae " limbs of a scattered poet.

Motto of the State of Arizona , United States, adopted in Probably derived from the translation of the Vulgate Bible of Genesis A popular, eloquent expression, usually used in the end of a speech. The implied meaning is that the speaker has said all that he had to say and thus his argument is completed. Attributed to Seneca the Younger. Of course, the same might equally be said of the concept of 'specific intent', a notion used in the common law almost exclusively within the context of the defense of voluntary intoxication.

Schabas [29]. Dominica in albis [depositis]. Latin name of the Octave of Easter in the Roman Catholic liturgy. Motto of the Southland College , Philippines. Psalm 28, 8. Dominus illuminatio mea. Motto of the University of Oxford , England. Psalm 27, 1. After Psalm 23, 1. A phrase used in the Roman Catholic liturgy , and sometimes in its sermons and homilies , and a general form of greeting among and towards members of Catholic organizations.

See also Pax vobiscum. Often set to music, either by itself or as the final phrase of the Agnus Dei prayer of the Holy Mass. Also an ending in the video game Haunting Ground. A legal concept in which a person in imminent mortal danger need not satisfy the otherwise requisite consideration to effect a testamentary donation, i.

Motto of the fictional Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry of the Harry Potter series; translated more loosely in the books as "never tickle a sleeping dragon". Stan Laurel , inscription for the fan club logo of The Sons of the Desert. Motto of the Royal Canadian Infantry Corps.

Attributed to Lucius Annaeus Seneca Sen. Meaning: "war may seem pleasant to those who have never been involved in it, though the experienced know better". Erasmus of Rotterdam. Horace , Odes 4, 12, Horace , Odes 3, 2, Horace , Ars Poetica : poetry must be dulce et utile , i. Horace , Odes , 3 25, Motto of the Scottish clan MacAulay. Motto of the Scottish clan Fergusson.

Motto of The Ravensbourne School. Used when someone has been asked for urgent help, but responds with no immediate action. Similar to Hannibal ante portas , but referring to a less personal danger. Motto of the State of South Carolina.

Motto of the Clan MacLennan. Motto of Presbyterian College. An encouragement to embrace life. Motto inscribed on the sword of the main character of the novel Glory Road. According to legend, the words spoken by the cardinal verifying that a newly-elected pope was a man, in a test employed after the reign of pope Joan. Meaning: "serving at the pleasure of the authority or officer who appointed". A Mediaeval legal Latin phrase.

Often used in medicine when the underlying disease causing a symptom is not known. See also idiopathic. Literally, out of more than one , one. Also the motto of S. Less commonly written as ex pluribus unum. From Luke in the Vulgate Bible. From the Gospel of John in the Vulgate Douay-Rheims , where Pontius Pilate speaks these words as he presents Christ , crowned with thorns, to the crowd. Bean , in which the full sung lyric is Ecce homo qui est faba "Behold the man who is a bean".

See also: Panis angelicus. From the canons of statutory interpretation in law. When more general descriptors follow a list of many specific descriptors, the otherwise wide meaning of the general descriptors is interpreted as restricted to the same class, if any, of the preceding specific descriptors. Part of the formula of Catholic sacramental absolution , i. The motto of Sidwell Friends School. Retired from office.

Often used to denote an office held at the time of one's retirement, as an honorary title, e. Inclusion in one's title does not necessarily denote that the honorand is inactive in the pertinent office. Motto of University of South Carolina. Or "being one's own cause". Traditionally, a being that owes its existence to no other being, hence God or a Supreme Being see also Primum Mobile.

Motto of the US state of Massachusetts , adopted in Occam's razor or Law of Parsimony; arguments which do not introduce extraneous variables are to be preferred in logical argumentation. Technical term in philosophy and law. Similar to ipso facto. Example: "The fact that I am does not eo ipso mean that I think. From Virgil , Aeneid , II. Used in law , especially international law , to denote a kind of universal obligation. Denotes a logical conclusion see also cogito ergo sum.

Sometimes attributed to Seneca the Younger , but not attested: Errare humanum est, perseverare autem diabolicum, et tertia non datur To err is human; to persist [in committing such errors] is of the devil, and the third possibility is not given. Several authors contemplated the idea before Seneca: Livy , Venia dignus error is humanus Storie , VIII, 35 and Cicero : is Cuiusvis errare: insipientis nullius nisi, in errore perseverare Anyone can err, but only the fool persists in his fault Philippicae , XII, 2, 5.

Cicero, being well-versed in ancient Greek, may well have been alluding to Euripides ' play Hippolytus some four centuries earlier. Lists of errors in a previous edition of a work are often marked with the plural errata "errors". Roman legal principle formulated by Pomponius in the Digest of the Corpus Juris Civilis , stating that legal actions undertaken by man under the influence of error are invalid. Motto of George Berkeley for his subjective idealist philosophical position that nothing exists independently of its perception by a mind except minds themselves.

Truly being a thing, rather than merely seeming to be a thing. The motto of many institutions. Prior to Cicero, Sallust used the phrase in Bellum Catilinae , 54, 6, writing that Cato esse quam videri bonus malebat "preferred to be good, rather than to seem so". Earlier still, Aeschylus used a similar phrase in Seven Against Thebes , line ou gar dokein aristos, all' enai thelei "he wishes not to seem the best, but to be the best". According to Potempski and Galmarini Atmos.

Motto of the US state of Idaho , adopted in ; of S. Motto of Wells Cathedral School. Alii is masculine , and therefore it can be used to refer to men, or groups of men and women; the feminine et aliae is proper when the "others" are all female, but as with many loanwords , interlingual use, such as in reference lists, is often invariable.

Et alia is neuter plural and thus in Latin text is properly used only for inanimate, genderless objects, but some use it as a gender-neutral alternative. AMA style forgoes the period because it forgoes the period on abbreviations generally and it forgoes the italic as it does with other loanwords naturalized into scientific English ; many journals that follow AMA style do likewise.

A response in the Dominus Vobiscum element of the Catholic Mass. From Genesis , "and there was light". See also Fiat lux. In other words, "I too am in Arcadia". See also memento mori. See also Lux in Tenebris. From the Book of Psalms , II. Vulgate , 2. Used in citations after a page number to indicate that further information in other locations in the cited resource. See also passim. Also et sequentia "and the following things": neut.

Commonly used in legal citations to refer to statutes that comprise several sequential sections of a code of statutes e. National Labor Relations Act , 29 U. Or "Even you, Brutus? Etiam si omnes, ego non. This sentence synthesizes a famous concept of Hugo Grotius In law , describes someone taking precautions against a very remote contingency. Also the basis for the term "an abundance of caution" employed by United States President Barack Obama to explain why the Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court John Roberts had to re-administer the presidential oath of office, and again in reference to terrorist threats.

Sometimes rendered without enim "for". Denoting "on equal footing", i. Used for those two seldom more participants of a competition who demonstrated identical performance. Often used on internal diplomatic event invitations. A motto sometimes inscribed on flags and mission plaques of diplomatic corps. Denoting "beforehand", "before the event", or "based on prior assumptions"; denoting a prediction.

Ex Astris Scientia. The motto of the fictional Starfleet Academy of Star Trek. Adapted from ex luna scientia , which in turn derived from ex scientia tridens. A phrase applied to the declarations or promulgations of the Catholic Supreme Pontiff Pope when, preserved from the possibility of error by the Holy Spirit see Papal infallibility , he solemnly declares or promulgates "from the chair" that was the ancient symbol of the teacher and governor, in this case of the Church a dogmatic doctrine on faith or morals as being contained in divine revelation, or at least being intimately connected to divine revelation.

Used, by extension, of anyone who is perceived as speaking as though with supreme authority. The motto of Cranleigh School , Surrey. The full legal phrase is ex dolo malo non oritur actio "an action does not arise from fraud". When an action has its origin in fraud or deceit, it cannot be supported; thus, a court of law will not assist a man who bases his course of action on an immoral or illegal act.

Motto of Rapha Cycling club see also Rapha sportswear. Idiomatically rendered "on the face of it". A legal term typically used to state that a document's explicit terms are defective absent further investigation.

More literally "from grace". Refers to someone voluntarily performing an act purely from kindness, as opposed to for personal gain or from being compelled to do it. In law , an ex gratia payment is one made without recognizing any liability or obligation. Recent academic notation denoting "from below in this writing". See also ex supra. Precedes a person's name, denoting "from the library of" the nominate; also a synonym for " bookplate ".

The motto of the Apollo 13 lunar mission, derived from ex scientia tridens , the motto of Jim Lovell 's alma mater , the United States Naval Academy. From Lucretius , and said earlier by Empedocles. Its original meaning is "work is required to succeed", but its modern meaning is a more general "everything has its origins in something" see also causality.

It is commonly applied to the conservation laws in philosophy and modern science. Ex nihilo is often used in conjunction with "creation", as in creatio ex nihilo , denoting "creation out of nothing". It is often used in philosophy and theology in connection with the proposition that God created the universe from nothing.

Denotes something that has been newly made or made from scratch see also de novo. The title of a short story by H. By virtue or right of office. Often used when someone holds one office by virtue of holding another: for example, the President of France is an ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra. A common misconception is that all ex officio members of a committee or congress may not vote; but in some cases they do.

In law ex officio can also refer to an administrative or judicial office taking action of its own accord, in the case of the latter the more common term is ex proprio motu or ex meru motu , for example to invalidate a patent or prosecute infringers of copyright. A theological phrase contrasted with ex opere operato , referring to the notion that the validity or promised benefit of a sacrament depends on the person administering it. A theological phrase meaning that the act of receiving a sacrament actually confers the promised benefit, such as a baptism actually and literally cleansing one's sins.

The Catholic Church affirms that the source of grace is God, not just the actions or disposition of the minister or the recipient of the sacrament. Originally refers to the sun rising in the east, but alludes to culture coming from the Eastern world.

Motto of several institutions. Shown on the logo as used by East Germany's CDU , a blue flag with two yellow stripes, a dove, and the CDU symbol in the center with the words ex oriente pax. A legal term that means "by one party" or "for one party".

Thus, on behalf of one side or party only. Or 'with due competence'. Said of the person who perfectly knows his art or science. Also used to mean "expressly". The term is a legal phrase; the legal citation guide called the Bluebook describes ex rel. An example of use is in court case titles such as Universal Health Services, Inc. United States ex rel. The United States Naval Academy motto. Refers to knowledge bringing men power over the sea comparable to that of the trident -bearing Greek god Poseidon.

In general, the claim that the absence of something demonstrates the proof of a proposition. An argumentum ex silentio " argument from silence " is an argument based on the assumption that someone's silence on a matter suggests "proves" when a logical fallacy that person's ignorance of the matter or their inability to counterargue validly. The motto of the University of Central Lancashire , Preston. Recent academic notation for "from above in this writing". See also ex infra.

Ex turpi causa non oritur actio. A legal doctrine which states that a claimant will be unable to pursue a cause of action, if it arises in connection with his own illegal act. Particularly relevant in the law of contract, tort and trusts. Ex Unitate Vires. Used in reference to the study or assay of living tissue in an artificial environment outside the living organism. Thus, in accordance with a promise. An ex voto is also an offering made in fulfillment of a vow. Also a catchphrase used by Marvel Comics head Stan Lee.

A juridical principle which means that the statement of a rule's exception e. Often mistranslated as "the exception that proves the rule ". More loosely, "he who excuses himself, accuses himself"—an unprovoked excuse is a sign of guilt.

In French , qui s'excuse, s'accuse. The abbreviation "e. It is not usually followed by a comma in British English, but it often is in American usage. On a plaque at the former military staff building of the Swedish Armed Forces. Third-person plural present active indicative of the Latin verb exire ; also seen in exeunt omnes , "all leave"; singular: exit. This term has been used in dermatopathology to express that there is no substitute for experience in dealing with all the numerous variations that may occur with skin conditions.

A principle of legal statutory interpretation : the explicit presence of a thing implies intention to exclude others; e. Sometimes expressed as expressum facit cessare tacitum broadly, "the expression of one thing excludes the implication of something else". Refers to a possible result of Catholic ecclesiastical legal proceedings when the culprit is removed from being part of a group like a monastery.

This expression comes from the Epistle to Jubaianus , paragraph 21, written by Saint Cyprian of Carthage , a bishop of the third century. It is often used to summarise the doctrine that the Catholic Church is absolutely necessary for salvation. It is issued by the Master of the Papal Liturgical Celebrations before a session of the Papal conclave which will elect a new Pope.

When spoken, all those who are not Cardinals , or those otherwise mandated to be present at the Conclave, must leave the Sistine Chapel. Refers to extraterritorial jurisdiction. Often cited in law of the sea cases on the high seas.

A Roman legal principle indicating that a witness who willfully falsifies one matter is not credible on any matter. The underlying motive for attorneys to impeach opposing witnesses in court: the principle discredits the rest of their testimony if it is without corroboration. Ovid , Metamorphoses Hypochromic anemia or chlorosis, once described as the "fever of love", which was believed to stem from the yearning for passion in virgins.

First written about in by the German physician Johannes Lange. Also known as "Disease of the Virgins". Slight variant "quod potui feci" found in James Boswell 's An Account of Corsica , there described as "a simple beautiful inscription on the front of Palazzo Tolomei at Siena".

Felicitas, Integritas Et Sapientia. Happiness , Integrity and Knowledge. People's beliefs are shaped largely by their desires. Julius Caesar , The Gallic War 3. An oxymoronic motto of Augustus. It encourages proceeding quickly, but calmly and cautiously. Equivalent to "more haste, less speed". Ovid [63]. Virgin Mary's response to the Annunciation. Horace , Ars Poetica ; advice presumably discounted by the magical realists.

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