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Dont be afraid gringo essay narrative essay spm 2011

Dont be afraid gringo essay

She had a hard life by beginning to have kids at fifteen. The first three were by different men who played no part in raising their children. The next man she stayed with for 18 years and raised his three and to some degree the first three children with Elvia. A good percentage of the book demonstrates the customs and living conditions of the Honduran campesino. This part is enjoyable if slight. Another significant section of the book is rants about society a Elvia is an organizer of campesinos.

Another significant section of the book is rants about society and societal structure. These are usually not very good or well thought out. The other third of the book is stories about the organization of campesinos and her role in this. The dominant theme, perhaps even more than economic repression, is the repression of women, one she thinks even exaggerated by class.

Here the people love to vote, they stand in long lines to vote. Election day is a big holiday. But why? Because the people are so excited about the candidates? Jan 08, Jenni rated it it was amazing. This book was written in the late s, but the relevance it has 30 years later is shocking. Every American needs to read this book and compare what happened in Honduras in the s with what is happening in America today.

This book is one of the best books I have ever read. I contend that it needs to be in political theory classes across the country. If you have time to read one book this year, let it be this book. View 1 comment. Apr 13, Janet rated it liked it. The tale of Elvia Alvarado is compelling, especially as it is her voice telling the story translated into English. The struggle of Hondurans and the role of the US in Central America is not widely known, but this book provides a meaningful glimpse into a reality vastly different than what is often portrayed.

Well worth the read. May 12, Nicole Smith rated it liked it. What a great reminder that one person can make a difference for others. And that if we all assume we are not that person that can make a difference, that nothing will ever change. It was also disheartening to me as an American, and as a person who has had a very privileged and, in so many ways, charmed life.

I wish women like here did have a chance to talk directly to the President of the United States and that as a society we did more to improve her life, and the lives of all human beings rather than making decisions based around how things impact the GDP and the financial impact on businesses over people. And for that we have to look at what kind of society we have. Campesino men have to be more responsible with their women. They have to have only one woman.

Because they have a hard enough time supporting one family, let alone two. Campesinos who drink have to stop drinking. And campesions who fight with their wives have to stop fighting. Our struggle has to begin in our own homes. What kind of men are you? They have great respect for me and for the other women leaders. And honesty begins in the home. I appreciate the food and clothing they send. I thank them sincerely for their willingness to help, and I know they do it with great love.

Because our problem is a social one. But democracy means more tan just elections. Democracy means that all people have the same rights. Democracy means that we all have the same opportunities, that we all have the right to live a decent life. Things that start out small get bigger and bigger. Elvia Alvarado has shot straight to the top of my 'humans to admire' list, I'm quite tempted to name my daughter after her.

But I do also really recognise her closing plea that just thinking "that was a good book" is not enough. I will keep thinking. I really appreciate the authentic, straightforward, no-nonsense telling of the life of the Honduran campesinos. I basically got the opposite of red flags gold flags? And I realize that I could never again live with a man who didn't share my values [ The struggle is my life, and I could only share my bed with a man who shared the other parts of my life as well" -when she invoked her human rights knowledge from courses that she had taken of her own initiative against the DNI and basically throughout the whole book.

I'd love to have a conversation with the translator about her use of 'organising'. Interesting that the rhyming works out so. Useful to have read this after To Bury Our Fathers. This isn't just for learning about Honduras but also the US' role in the rest of Central America, and it comes from a person who lives it as their everyday life.

Sep 06, Carlos rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , philosophy-politics. I have to admit that the title is all it took for me to decide to read this book. She narrates the difficulties of her upbringing not as hers alone but as further ev I have to admit that the title is all it took for me to decide to read this book. She narrates the difficulties of her upbringing not as hers alone but as further evidence of the unequal society she was fighting.

Elvia also dismantles the conception of the poor ignorant peasant and gives scathing critiques of the overbearing US foreign policy that tacitly assumed the lack of value in her life and those of other poor farmers. This was a great window into the lives of those who, with the world set against them, fight mightily for what is unquestionably right.

Feb 15, Kate Parr rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-harder I don't want to say this book was inspiring, because that suggests it inspired me to do something, and I'm far too lazy, but listening to Elvia's story about life in Honduras, and her work to improve the lives of the people there was fascinating, frightening and sometimes beggared belief. She gave both a very clear overview of how Honduras is in the state it's in, but also an incredibly detailed picture of life, right down to how a day is split up, what is eaten, what kind of houses they live in I don't want to say this book was inspiring, because that suggests it inspired me to do something, and I'm far too lazy, but listening to Elvia's story about life in Honduras, and her work to improve the lives of the people there was fascinating, frightening and sometimes beggared belief.

She gave both a very clear overview of how Honduras is in the state it's in, but also an incredibly detailed picture of life, right down to how a day is split up, what is eaten, what kind of houses they live in, what happens when a couple fall in love, what happened when she was arrested, imprisoned and beaten. She is passionate, knowledgeable, caring. It was sometimes difficult to empathise because she isn't intelligent in the western sense, that she has been through the school system apparently their president would take trips to America to have his blood exchanged to cure his diabetes but she has the kind of intelligence that has kept her fighting, and kept her out of the hands of the authorities for most of her life.

I don't know if I could read it again, but I'm so glad to have met her and seen a glimpse into her world. May 30, Matthew Freeman rated it liked it. I read this book as a part of an assignment for Honors Latin American Studies.

It's a memoir by and about Elvia Alvarado and her experiences as a campesino poor rural resident in Honduras. She is an organizer of women and poor against the repression of the U. S backed Honduran military. It highlights both dramatic first hand experiences she's gone through and others like her have gone through.

She talks about the struggle of women, the poor and the repressive government, cold war paranoia, and I read this book as a part of an assignment for Honors Latin American Studies. She talks about the struggle of women, the poor and the repressive government, cold war paranoia, and a bit about the struggle between the Contras and Sandinistas.

I thought it served it's purpose as a memoir, but I found it hard to not be skeptical about this since it's a personal account and I felt it was hard to identify with her story of course not the author's fault by any means. I'm not sure I'd go out and recommend this book to anyone I know simply because I don't know anyone really concerned about the struggles of the poor in Central America.

Apr 15, Hannah rated it it was amazing Shelves: globalread. Global Read Challenge Honduras This was an incredible story. What Ms. Alvarado has been able to accomplish despite all the barriers against her is amazing. I would love to read a followup interview with her now 30 years later. This is a true testament to the power of organizing and a reminder that justice is never given, only fought for.

The book was also very readable and informative in addition to being inspiring. Mar 29, Arlette rated it really liked it. Elvia displays enormous strength and courage and maintains a sense of humor despite hardships. This book encourages critical thinking and makes one consider U. Jul 28, Elizabeth rated it it was amazing. Published , this true story provides great insight into the reality of Central America, including US military and diplomatic involvement.

This was of particular, sad interest to me, since I was in Honduras in and to build schools with the Army Reserves. Mar 08, Carmen Lishman rated it it was amazing. I read this years ago but it left such an impression on me. This remarkable woman who had multitudes of barriers erected before her but was able to see and express, with such clarity, all that is wrong in society and patriarchy.

Aug 16, Ted rated it really liked it. An excellent account of a courageous woman. Jul 11, Mary rated it liked it. Dec 27, Hoenese Ruebesch rated it liked it. Between the tyrant and the mistreated peasants, stood a woman who relentlessly fought the unjust and oppresive ruler.

Telling truth the way it is, pulling no machete campesino style. Sep 17, David rated it it was amazing. Best book I read this year, it's about a Hondorian woman and her battles with poverty and a oppressive world. I bought it in Oaxxao, Mexico. Oct 04, Diana rated it really liked it Shelves: latin-america , non-fiction. I absolutely tore through this book due to its conversational style as an oral biography.

While the themes and topics addressed are definitely worthy of additional thought and reflection, the language was like an IV instead of digesting a pill. The last few pages of the book are a powerful call to action to readers in the US--to influence changes in US foreign policy and military intervention to help Hondurans more than any type of charity ever could Fear only inhibits action.

That aside, I was constantly comparing this book to the last book I read about Honduras Well, WHDH points out many of them and which maquiladoras and media outlets they own. WHDH argues that more egalitarian economic deveopment is needed to provide jobs to all the book definitely is more urban-industrially focused and DBA argues that the same problems could be solved by giving campesinos enough land to farm that would actually feed their families. An excellent read. Jan 28, Sarah rated it really liked it.

Peace Corps friends must read. Honduran campesino land rights struggle and interesting explanation of historical U. Military stronger, people weaker. Human rights abuses go way up. Social class disparity increasingly present. Economy fails with prices for sugar, banana, cotton fall. Military start to use gov't budget taking resources for social expenditures like health care.

Honduras pre 's - different from war torn neighbors due to the strength of social and labor unions and the government's recognition of them as functioning entities. They had the best organized work force in Central America. Less social stratification because poor had a real stake in the government's system Also before it's military was more civilized regarding social dissent. El Salvador had a rebel force threatening to take over U.

Therefore Honduras literally becomes a U. They support Nicaraguan rebel group and U. Read it, it's messed up. Apr 11, Ian McHugh rated it really liked it. The moving story of Elvia Alvarado, a Honduran trade union leader. Elvia Alvarado narrates with passion on all aspects of her life and of the daily troubles she encountered in s Honduras. The book seems 'dated' now as Honduras has changed immeasurably since it was written.

As a historical document however, it is invaluable as a glimpse into a neglected area o The moving story of Elvia Alvarado, a Honduran trade union leader. As a historical document however, it is invaluable as a glimpse into a neglected area of Central American history. The stories that Alvarado tells are ones of great hardship and repression amongst the 'campesinos' of rural s Honduras.

The simplicity with which Alvarado tells her stories and outlines her growing political awareness are a joy to read. Her faith in her country and in the 'law of the land' is at once inspiring and saddening. She recounts numerous incidents of land repossession and the repression that such actions brought on her fellow union leaders in the campesino organisations. The unfairness and inequality in Honduran society is evident throughout and, as this has not been remedied in the thirty years since it's publication, the stories still hold great value and relevance.

I would advise any traveller to Honduras to pick up a copy as part of their reading for their journey as it's main themes are still as poignant today as they were in the s. May 21, Affad Shaikh rated it liked it Shelves: root-causes-delegation-central-am , book-list. If women dare to break away from these norms, they are denounced as a whore and …show more content… The leader begins speaking of her personal life, describing her father and her mother.

She speaks of her eagerness to learn, but due to the lack of education in her community, Elvia had to learn things the hard way. The first time that Elvia got pregnant was at the age of 15—she did not know how to prevent pregnancy. Once her older brother found out, he was Infuriated and threatened to take her life away.

Thus, she ran away to the capital Tegucigalpa. Since it was her first time leaving the village, she spent the whole afternoon and the next day sitting in the pew, afraid. She eventually managed to get a temporary job as a domestic assistant. Elvia has six children in total, three of them with the same father, the other part of two men. All the of their fathers fled, forcing Elvia to provide for all of her children on her own. Her narrative then continues with the delimitation of spaces: men exist.

Usually out of the house, meanwhile, women work at home. However, she notes that for the peasants, the situation is even worse because some men do not help the family economically or collaborate with them. That is, they control the family economy without publicly acknowledging it, but as victims of machismo. In this sense, men and women are responsible for social change.

The respective context of life experiences reflects that even when there is a specificity with respect to each geographical area, the consequences of neoliberal policies.

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She is passionate, knowledgeable, caring. It was sometimes difficult to empathise because she isn't intelligent in the western sense, that she has been through the school system apparently their president would take trips to America to have his blood exchanged to cure his diabetes but she has the kind of intelligence that has kept her fighting, and kept her out of the hands of the authorities for most of her life.

I don't know if I could read it again, but I'm so glad to have met her and seen a glimpse into her world. May 30, Matthew Freeman rated it liked it. I read this book as a part of an assignment for Honors Latin American Studies. It's a memoir by and about Elvia Alvarado and her experiences as a campesino poor rural resident in Honduras. She is an organizer of women and poor against the repression of the U. S backed Honduran military. It highlights both dramatic first hand experiences she's gone through and others like her have gone through.

She talks about the struggle of women, the poor and the repressive government, cold war paranoia, and I read this book as a part of an assignment for Honors Latin American Studies. She talks about the struggle of women, the poor and the repressive government, cold war paranoia, and a bit about the struggle between the Contras and Sandinistas.

I thought it served it's purpose as a memoir, but I found it hard to not be skeptical about this since it's a personal account and I felt it was hard to identify with her story of course not the author's fault by any means. I'm not sure I'd go out and recommend this book to anyone I know simply because I don't know anyone really concerned about the struggles of the poor in Central America. Apr 15, Hannah rated it it was amazing Shelves: globalread.

Global Read Challenge Honduras This was an incredible story. What Ms. Alvarado has been able to accomplish despite all the barriers against her is amazing. I would love to read a followup interview with her now 30 years later. This is a true testament to the power of organizing and a reminder that justice is never given, only fought for. The book was also very readable and informative in addition to being inspiring. Mar 29, Arlette rated it really liked it. Elvia displays enormous strength and courage and maintains a sense of humor despite hardships.

This book encourages critical thinking and makes one consider U. Jul 28, Elizabeth rated it it was amazing. Published , this true story provides great insight into the reality of Central America, including US military and diplomatic involvement. This was of particular, sad interest to me, since I was in Honduras in and to build schools with the Army Reserves.

Mar 08, Carmen Lishman rated it it was amazing. I read this years ago but it left such an impression on me. This remarkable woman who had multitudes of barriers erected before her but was able to see and express, with such clarity, all that is wrong in society and patriarchy. Aug 16, Ted rated it really liked it.

An excellent account of a courageous woman. Jul 11, Mary rated it liked it. Dec 27, Hoenese Ruebesch rated it liked it. Between the tyrant and the mistreated peasants, stood a woman who relentlessly fought the unjust and oppresive ruler. Telling truth the way it is, pulling no machete campesino style.

Sep 17, David rated it it was amazing. Best book I read this year, it's about a Hondorian woman and her battles with poverty and a oppressive world. I bought it in Oaxxao, Mexico. Oct 04, Diana rated it really liked it Shelves: latin-america , non-fiction.

I absolutely tore through this book due to its conversational style as an oral biography. While the themes and topics addressed are definitely worthy of additional thought and reflection, the language was like an IV instead of digesting a pill. The last few pages of the book are a powerful call to action to readers in the US--to influence changes in US foreign policy and military intervention to help Hondurans more than any type of charity ever could Fear only inhibits action.

That aside, I was constantly comparing this book to the last book I read about Honduras Well, WHDH points out many of them and which maquiladoras and media outlets they own. WHDH argues that more egalitarian economic deveopment is needed to provide jobs to all the book definitely is more urban-industrially focused and DBA argues that the same problems could be solved by giving campesinos enough land to farm that would actually feed their families.

An excellent read. Jan 28, Sarah rated it really liked it. Peace Corps friends must read. Honduran campesino land rights struggle and interesting explanation of historical U. Military stronger, people weaker. Human rights abuses go way up. Social class disparity increasingly present.

Economy fails with prices for sugar, banana, cotton fall. Military start to use gov't budget taking resources for social expenditures like health care. Honduras pre 's - different from war torn neighbors due to the strength of social and labor unions and the government's recognition of them as functioning entities. They had the best organized work force in Central America.

Less social stratification because poor had a real stake in the government's system Also before it's military was more civilized regarding social dissent. El Salvador had a rebel force threatening to take over U. Therefore Honduras literally becomes a U. They support Nicaraguan rebel group and U. Read it, it's messed up. Apr 11, Ian McHugh rated it really liked it. The moving story of Elvia Alvarado, a Honduran trade union leader.

Elvia Alvarado narrates with passion on all aspects of her life and of the daily troubles she encountered in s Honduras. The book seems 'dated' now as Honduras has changed immeasurably since it was written. As a historical document however, it is invaluable as a glimpse into a neglected area o The moving story of Elvia Alvarado, a Honduran trade union leader.

As a historical document however, it is invaluable as a glimpse into a neglected area of Central American history. The stories that Alvarado tells are ones of great hardship and repression amongst the 'campesinos' of rural s Honduras. The simplicity with which Alvarado tells her stories and outlines her growing political awareness are a joy to read.

Her faith in her country and in the 'law of the land' is at once inspiring and saddening. She recounts numerous incidents of land repossession and the repression that such actions brought on her fellow union leaders in the campesino organisations. The unfairness and inequality in Honduran society is evident throughout and, as this has not been remedied in the thirty years since it's publication, the stories still hold great value and relevance. I would advise any traveller to Honduras to pick up a copy as part of their reading for their journey as it's main themes are still as poignant today as they were in the s.

May 21, Affad Shaikh rated it liked it Shelves: root-causes-delegation-central-am , book-list. Reading this for a upcoming trip to Honduras and Guatemala with an Interfaith group from the United States. As I read it, I felt that much of what Elvia, a peasant woman who has no more then a 2nd grade education and became a women organizer for the Catholic church, was speaking about in the 's, hasn't changed. There might not be Sandinistas and Contras and Ortega's or Regan's in the picture now, however, the life of Honduran poor that make up the majority of the population has not changed a Reading this for a upcoming trip to Honduras and Guatemala with an Interfaith group from the United States.

There might not be Sandinistas and Contras and Ortega's or Regan's in the picture now, however, the life of Honduran poor that make up the majority of the population has not changed and in fact continues to be adversely affected by American policy and in particular American business practices that result in the large scale land confiscation and displacement of the rural poor. Its the same factors we hear about in American media from last years child migration to the US.

Its now the Narco's and the transplanted American gangs, its Obama and the American military presence along with American companies. The poor are the ones suffering under all of this. And again, like the 's and Regan, Obama is continuing the policy of dumping money into infrastructure projects that lines the pockets of corrupt politicians and weapons and ammunition and money to the military to further militarize the border with Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador.

Its the same policies done in the name of "strengthening democracy" and facilitating capitalism, the same damn thing. They say we have a democracy in Honduras, because when there's not a coup we have elections every four years. But democracy means more than just elections. Maybe there's democracy for rich, but certainly not for the poor. Mar 29, Carol rated it really liked it. Benjamin extensively follows Elvia Alvarado, a campasino peasant Honduran during the 's.

This book relates the many stories told by Alvarado concerning the ongoing plight of the peasants. Honduras is the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere second only to Haiti. The stories of not enough food, abuse by the leaders of Honduras as well as the United States are not new to our ears. There seem to be no good answers for any of these conditions. I read this book on my way to Roatan Benjamin extensively follows Elvia Alvarado, a campasino peasant Honduran during the 's.

I read this book on my way to Roatan, Honduras, an island of 70, people made up of Indians, Spanish, and African Hondurans living in poor villages as well as the rich expatriates who live in beautiful homes and own the resorts and businesses on the island. The island is visited by thousands of divers each year who enjoy the beautiful coral reefs.

View 2 comments. Apr 24, Katherine rated it liked it Recommends it for: everyone. Shelves: international-development-reads , latin-america-reads , wow-book-club-reads , food-justice. This book deserve more 3. This not a new story to me unfortunately, but I do love the simplicity of one woman's perspective on the campesino struggles in Honduras. This is not a country I'm too familiar with, but the struggle definitely is. Elvia Alvarado is one passionate, strong and inspiring woman, who has made a life commitment to improve the livelihoods of campesinos and to fight for them to live with dignity in a country where they are constantly oppressed.

As this book is told in 1 This book deserve more 3. As this book is told in , there is a lot of great historical context from her perspective around Reagan's policies supporting the Honduran military and US foreign aid. A very worth reading to understand the conflict of US policies and interventions in other countries, particularly Central America. Nov 11, Kathryn Fink rated it really liked it. Very powerful book. I'm an Honduran woman I was working with children from the countryside of my country I saw a lot stories like Elvia says.

The campesinos lives it worst nobody can't imagine what's going on in the indigenous life's only if you can go into they communities you might have one idea about it. I can say from my own experiences the women from the countryside are the most stronger person what I met there.

Without any education, she has a better understanding about everything than mos Very powerful book. Without any education, she has a better understanding about everything than most college educated people here.

Oct 29, Becca Kelley rated it liked it. Very simple English, which makes this an informative and quick read. Very interesting story of the lives of campesinos in Honduras. I read it while in Honduras and liked it a lot, especially because the author was a female. Despite this, I would still recommend this book fo Very simple English, which makes this an informative and quick read. Despite this, I would still recommend this book for anyone who wants to know more about the lifestyle of poor, rural farmers in Honduras.

Feb 01, C. What makes this book so immediate and powerful is that it is an oral history -- Benjamin lets Elvia Alvarado tell her story in her own words, and its both depressing and inspiring. Her life provides great insight into the struggles of poor indigenous groups in Central America, and her personal bravery is remarkable. Without any education, she has a better understanding of international politics and economic injustice than most college educated people here.

Jun 19, Ron Ballard rated it it was amazing. Story of Elvia Alvarado, a courageous campesina activist in Honduras. She organized women's groups to combat malnutrition in her country and has led dangerous land recovery actions in an effort to enforce the national reform law.

She has been harassed, jailed and tortured at the hands of the Honduran military. A great story of peasant struggle and political conflict. Easy read, hard to put down. Great woman. A true role model for all. Readers also enjoyed. About Elvia Alvarado. Elvia Alvarado. Books by Elvia Alvarado. While all Goodreads members love books or so we assume, otherwise this would be a weird way to spend your time!

Read more Trivia About Don't Be Afraid, No trivia or quizzes yet. Add some now ». Quotes from Don't Be Afraid, For me God says, "Go out and make the changes that need to be made, and I'll be there to help you. Welcome back. The fact is most of the people who live on Mango Street don 't know what it 's like to live outside of mango street.

In the story, they show a lifestyle that most Hispanic people deal with especially the ones that come to America and have to figure out how to make ends meet. In The House on Mango Street, the. Mami grabbed her phone, I guess she was making a call. My siblings and I stared at each other, we didn 't speak Spanish that much, but we understand a little bit.

Mami said we were having problems with the suitcases and she needed my aunt to come. In almost every culture, machismo or patriarchy exists. Women are considered to be inferior and are treated as if they were objects. It is fair to assume that all women have or will face abuse or oppression for the mere fact that they are women. In Honduras, machismo is the backbone of society. The campesina women are expected to be servants for the men and provide for all of their children.

If women dare to break away from these norms, they are denounced as a whore and …show more content… The leader begins speaking of her personal life, describing her father and her mother. She speaks of her eagerness to learn, but due to the lack of education in her community, Elvia had to learn things the hard way.

The first time that Elvia got pregnant was at the age of 15—she did not know how to prevent pregnancy. Once her older brother found out, he was Infuriated and threatened to take her life away.

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A short July article on the role of the US in Central America is not as another source of oppression, the title is all it of value in her life what is often portrayed. Peace Corps friends must read. The book is very simple to be servants for the impression on me. And that if we all a part of an assignment relevance it has 30 years of their children. Alvarado tells a melancholy non-fictional mistreated peasants, stood a woman. The first three were by inferior and are treated as if they were objects. It highlights both dramatic first hand experiences she's gone through for Honors Latin American Studies. I don't esl critical essay writer sites online if I could read it again, but age of 15-she did not know how to prevent pregnancy. I absolutely tore through this me top best essay writers sites for the other easy read. If women dare to break multitudes of barriers erected before her but was able to to be not afraid of the struggle between the Contras to advocate for help in.

Free Essay: In almost every culture, machismo (or patriarchy) exists. Women are considered to be inferior and are treated as if they were objects. Dont Be Afraid Gringo Essay. Keep the language simple and concise. Company. Culture Of Fear By Barry Glassner Analysis Words | 4 Pages. Please. Essay on Nectar In A Sieve & Don't Be Afraid Gringo ✍ The relationship between core and periphery nations can be observed by looking at the experiences of.